The Municipality of Kincardine has made a commitment to develop meaningful relationships with Indigenous Peoples and work toward reconciliation. Part of this commitment includes developing awareness and acknowledging the truths of our history and the harms that have been completed against Indigenous peoples.  There cannot be reconciliation without understanding and acknowledging the truth. 

orangeshirtday

September 30th marks the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, which was selected to coincide with the Orange Shirt Day which began in 2013. Orange Shirt Day is an Indigenous-led grassroots commemorative day that honours the children who survived Indian Residential Schools and remembers those who did not.

Everyone is encourage to find a way to participate by wearing orange, reading articles and watching videos, or encouraging learning at your school or place of work.

Commemorating the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

Wear an orange shirt

The Municipality of Kincardine encourages everyone to find a way to participate by wearing orange, watching national events, or promoting learning at their school or place of work. 

Learn more on the Orange Shirt Day website.

During the week of September 26th to September 30th, the Municipality of Kincardine will be providing posters, resources, and materials for the public to pick up at the following municipal facilities: 

  • • Davidson Centre
  • • Underwood Community Centre
  • • Municipal Administration Centre  
  • • Tiverton Sports Centre 

Review a list of resources to educate yourself and do more than just wear orange. 

Flags at Half Mast

The Municipality of Kincardine will be flying the “Survivors' flag”  and the Canadian Flag at half-mast from September 30th to October 2nd. The Survivors' Flag is an expression of remembrance, meant to honour residential school Survivors and all the lives and communities impacted by the residential school system in Canada. Each element depicted on the flag was carefully selected by Survivors from across Canada, who were consulted in the flag’s creation.

Journey to Reconciliation Ongoing Speaker Series

Speaker Deborah Johnson from the Orange Shirt Day Society will be speaking on Wednesday, October 12th at 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 pm via zoom. Deborah is a Northern Shuswap tribal member, and is from the Alkali Lake First Nations and Canoe Creek First Nations. 

Deborah has been a public speaker for over a decade and shares her residential school experience at the St. Joseph Residential School in Williams Lake, B.C.

Deborah says that “The purpose of her sharing her residential school experience is to bring awareness to the public so reconciliation and healing can occur.” 

Register for the series or email: lfioze@kincardine.ca

National Indigenous History Month 

June is National Indigenous History month. It is time for all Canadians to reflect on the unique histories, sacrifices, culture, contributions, and strengths of our First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Peoples. We need to understand the past history in order to move towards reconciliation. View this resource. National Indigenous History Month invites Indigenous Peoples to celebrate their history in the spirit of pride and preservation. For non-Indigenous Canadians, it is an opportunity to learn and show recognition of the role Indigenous Peoples have played and continue to play in shaping Canada. Find out more.


MUNICIPALITY OF KINCARDINE INITIATIVES

May 5- National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and Two-Spirit People (MMIWG2S)
May 5 is designated as the National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and Two-Spirit People (MMIWG2S). This is a day to honour and remember all missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBT+ People who are more than twelve times as likely to go missing or be murdered than any other population in Canada. 

 

From 2015-2019, Canada conducted a National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, (Home Page - Final Report | MMIWG (mmiwg-ffada.ca)which concluded:

 

“The National Inquiry’s Final Report reveals that persistent and deliberate human and Indigenous rights violations and abuses are the root cause behind Canada’s staggering rates of violence against Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQ+ people. The two volume report calls for transformative legal and social changes to resolve the crisis that has devastated Indigenous communities across the country.”

 

“Colonial violence, as well as racism, sexism, homophobia, and transphobia against Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQ+ people, has become embedded in everyday life – whether this is through interpersonal forms of violence, through institutions like the healthcare system and the justice system, or in the laws, policies and structures of Canadian society. The result has been that many Indigenous people have grown up normalized to violence, while Canadian society shows an appalling apathy to addressing the issue. The National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls finds that this amounts to genocide.” (Executive Summary of Final Report)

 

To support the ongoing learning, we invite you to continue your learned and explore the following resources: 

 

  • Podcast: CBC’s Finding Cleo. Where is Cleo? Apprehended by child welfare authorities as part of a wave now known as the Sixties Scoop, and adopted in the U.S., the young Cree girl is believed to have been raped and murdered while hitchhiking back home to Saskatchewan. CBC offers additional support material.
    • Season 1: Highlights the interconnected and complex nature of the ongoing tragedy of Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. In 1989, 24-year-old Alberta Williams was found dead along the Highway of Tears near Prince Rupert, B.C. Police never caught her killer. Twenty-seven years later, her unsolved murder continues to haunt her family. Additional resources available.
    • Season 2: Highlights the interconnected and complex nature of the ongoing tragedy of Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. 
  • Podcast: Warrior Life by Pam Palmater (numerous related episodes including “Judy Wilson & Ellen Gabriel on Canada's Failed National Action Plan,” “Canada's Genocide: Murdered & Missing Indigenous Women and Girls”)
  • Video: CBC A look back at the MMIWG inquiry (3:52)
 Land Acknowledgement

The Municipality of Kincardine has made a commitment to develop meaningful relationships with Indigenous Peoples and work toward reconciliation. Part of this commitment includes developing awareness and acknowledging the truths of our history and the harms that have been completed against Indigenous peoples.  There cannot be reconciliation without understanding and acknowledging the truth. 

One step in our journey to reconciliation is to acknowledge the land that the Municipal meeting and/or public event is being held on. 

View the Land Acknowledgement.

 History of the Land from a First Nations, Métis and Inuit Perspective

To help us understand the history of the land we are on we have arranged to have two training sessions for staff, Council, Committees of Council and the Community: 

This training will be conducted by Trish Nadjiwon Meekins. She will present the history of First Nations peoples from a First Nations' perspective.  Trish will also bring you on a journey from before contact with the newcomers of Turtle Island to where we are today.  It is our responsibility to understand what it means to be treaty people and brainstorm ways to move forward from where we are today. 

 Trish Meekins will be providing this training.  Trish is the sole owner of Nikaanaganaa Counselling & Learning Centre is a counsellor and teacher of First Nations culture and history for over 20 years. Her passion is her Indigenous roots and finds rewarding work in assisting all people become educated about themselves and how they fit as a part of community extending out to all of Creation. Learn more about Trish at https://trishmeekins.com.

The next sessions TBD. 

 Reconciliation: Where will you start?
 
 

Residential School Virtual Video Tour of the Mohawk Institute

Residential schools have impacted and will continue to impact Indigenous Peoples across Canada.  In order to understand why residential schools have such a negative impact we invite you to participate in a virtual tour of the Mohawk Institute Residential School. The virtual video tour was created with the production company “Thru the Reddoor”, and it follows guide Lorrie Gallant, as she gives a tour of the former Mohawk Institute Indian Residential School. During the video Lorrie provides the history of the institution over its 140 year history. Viewers will get to see the different rooms in the school, from the girls’ and boys’ dormitories, the cafeteria, laundry room, and other rooms throughout the building, as well as hear interviews from five Survivors of the Mohawk Institute. 

Resources from the Mohawk Institute Residential School Tour

school

 Two Spirit (2S)
 

Ever wonder what the 2S is in LGBTQ2S+? 

Two Spirit (2S) is an English umbrella term to reflect and restore Indigenous traditions forcefully suppressed by colonization, honouring the fluid and diverse nature of gender and attraction and its connection to community and spirituality. It is used by some Indigenous People rather than, or in addition to, identifying as LGBTQI. 

Watch this video produced by Egale, an organization with a mission to improve the lives of 2SLGBTQI people in Canada and to enhance the global response. 

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